Razer Unveils World's First Mecha-Membrane Keyboard Technology

SEATTLE, WA—(Marketwired – September 03, 2016) – (PAX West 2016) – Razer™, a world leader in connected devices and software for gamers, today announced the Razer Ornata, a line of gaming keyboards featuring revolutionary Razer Mecha–Membrane™ technology.

Designed to combine the most desirable traits of membrane rubber dome design with the merits of mechanical keyboard technology, the Razer Mecha–Membrane delivers both a soft, cushioned touch and a crisp, tactile click with each keystroke.

Traditionally, users choose membrane rubber dome keyboards for comfort, while mechanical switches are favored for fast actuations and distinct tactile feedback. The Razer Mecha–Membrane is a unique mid–height keycap hybrid that provides a comfortable and efficient typing experience unlike any key type on the market.

“The Razer Mecha–Membrane is the result of years of research and development that we've dedicated to build the best keyboards for gamers,” says Min–Liang Tan, Razer co–founder and CEO. “When we moved to our own Razer Mechanical Switches in our production lines, we were excited to learn from real–use scenarios and apply that knowledge to perfect other technologies. The Razer Ornata is a great example of how our engineers can use feedback to innovate something truly amazing for gamers, in this case a solution that melds two seemingly disparate keyboard technologies for a phenomenal experience.”

The Razer Ornata Chroma features individually backlit keys that are powered by Razer Chroma™ technology, which unlocks customizable lighting features that can be synced across devices. Gamers can choose from 16.8 million colors and a variety of effects. Custom settings can be created using the Razer Synapse software platform and shared with millions of other Razer software users via the Razer Chroma Workshop. In–game Razer Chroma lighting profiles are also integrated into popular game titles, including “Overwatch,” “Call of Duty®: Black Ops III,” “Blade and Soul” and more. These profiles can display tutorials, in–game actions and more.

Also included in the Razer Ornata package is a detachable ergonomic wrist rest that is magnetically held in place to make it easily removable for smaller work and gaming spaces.

An alternate version of the Razer Ornata with monochrome green backlighting will be available as well. It will have ability to display dynamic lighting effects via Razer Synapse.

The Razer Ornata Chroma and Razer Ornata are available for pre order now from RazerStore.com. For more information, please visit www.razerzone.com/ornata–chroma

About the Razer Ornata Chroma

Price:
U.S. $99.99

Availability:
Razerzone.com – Immediate
Worldwide – October 2016

Product features:

  • Razer™ Mecha–Membrane Technology
  • Mid–height keycaps
  • Razer Chroma backlighting
  • Ergonomic wrist rest
  • Razer Synapse enabled
  • Fully programmable keys with on the fly macro recording
  • 10–key roll over
  • Dedicated Gaming Mode
  • Anti–ghosting capability for up to 10 simultaneous key presses
  • Approximate size:
    • Length: 463 mm / 18.22 in
    • Width: 154 mm / 6.06 in
    • Height: 31 mm / 1.22 in
  • Approximate weight: 950 g / 2.1 lbs

About the Razer Ornata

Price:
U.S. $79.99

Availability:
Razerzone.com – Immediate
Worldwide – October 2016

Product features:

  • Razer™ Mecha–Membrane Technology
  • Mid–height keycaps
  • Individually backlit keys
  • Ergonomic wrist rest
  • Razer Synapse enabled
  • Fully programmable keys with on the fly macro recording
  • 10–key roll over
  • Dedicated Gaming Mode
  • Anti–ghosting capability for up to 10 simultaneous key presses
  • Approximate size:
    • Length: 463 mm / 18.22 in
    • Width: 154 mm / 6.06 in
    • Height: 31 mm / 1.22 in
  • Approximate weight: 950 g / 2.1 lbs

Images:

For digital screens (websites, mobile, social media)
Razer Ornata Chroma
Razer Ornata

For print (magazines, posters, brochures)
Razer Ornata Chroma – Black Background
Razer Ornata Chroma – White Background
Razer Ornata – Black Background
Razer Ornata – White Background

ABOUT RAZER:

Razer™ is a world leader in connected devices and software for gamers.

Razer is transforming the way people play games, engage with other gamers and identify with the gamer lifestyle. Having won the coveted “Best of CES” award consecutively for six years, the company's leadership in product innovation continues to create new categories for the gaming community that is estimated to have over 1 billion gamers worldwide.

Razer's award–winning design and technology include an array of user interface and systems devices, voice–over IP for gamers and a cloud platform for customizing and enhancing gaming devices.

Founded in 2005, Razer is backed by Intel Capital, IDG–Accel and Heliconia Capital Management (Heliconia), a wholly owned subsidiary of Singapore investment company Temasek. For more information visit http://www.razerzone.com/about–razer.

Razer – For Gamers. By Gamers.™

At the Nexus of Water and Climate Change

In less than 15 years, a 40 percent global shortfall in water supply versus demand is expected if we carry on with business as usual. Credit: Bigstock

In less than 15 years, a 40 percent global shortfall in water supply versus demand is expected if we carry on with business as usual. Credit: Bigstock

By Justus Wanjala
STOCKHOLM, Sep 3 2016 (IPS)

With the clock counting down towards the November climate summit in Marrakech, Morocco, where parties to the climate treaty agreed in Paris will negotiate implementation, it’s clear that managing water resources will be a key aspect of any effective deal.

Here at World Water Week, which concluded on Friday, Susanne Skyllerstedt, programme officer for Water, Climate Change and Development at the Global Water Partnership (GWP), says her organisation is working with Sub-Saharan African governments to incorporate adaptation strategies into the partnership’s climate change programme.

“For us, resolutions of COP21 are part and parcel of what we are implementing and those of COP22 (in Marrakech) will be embedded in our long-term agenda of ensuring water security in Africa and rest of the developing world in a bid to attain water-related sustainable development goals,” she told IPS.

GWP is a Stockholm-based organisation that has been involved in fostering integrated water resource management around the world for the last 20 years. GPS has four regional offices in Africa covering Southern, Eastern, Central and West Africa.

As an inter-governmental entity, GWP works with organisations involved in water resources management. These range from national government’s institutions, United Nations agencies to funding bodies. Other stakeholders include professional associations, research institutions, non-governmental organisations, and the private sector. GWP has a water and climate change programme to support governments on water security and climate change resilience.

Already, said Skyllerstedt, GWP has a programme that was started in Africa through the African Ministers Council on Water (AMCOW) together with the African Union Commission and other development partners. The programme has been a key platform for supporting African governments.

These include support on national climate change adaptation programmes more so in the sphere of policy formulation. For Sub-Saharan Africa countries noted for vulnerability to impacts of global climate change, the programme is key in supporting climate adaptation and mitigation initiatives.

Through monitoring and evaluation programmes conducted in the recent past, GWP has learned vital lessons and is cognisant of areas that need more resources to achieve the desired goals. Already, she said, GWP is running a three-year programme on climate change aimed at achieving sustainable development goals linked to water, energy and food through climate resilience.

She said they are implementing initiatives aimed at enabling countries in Sub-Saharan Africa to acquire highly relevant technologies on sustainable water management. “We have demo programmes on new technologies being implemented by our partners in Africa but they need to be scaled up to have a major impact,” she said.

GWP is also addressing the challenge of water pollution, to ensure availability of cleaner water for human consumption and other uses. It is collaborating with the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) to promote water security and hygiene. “The aim is to incorporate water, sanitation and hygiene component in climate resilience,” Skyllerstedt explained.

GWP is also developing tools for better planning on water, sanitation and hygiene to help communities during calamities such as floods.

“We have an urban planning project focusing on urban water systems and infrastructure we work with national government and other partners on issues planning putting into consideration matters of access to water and sanitation facilities as well as water related calamities.

At the same time GWP collaborates with the World Meteorological Organisation (WMO) on drought and flood monitoring.

“We work with experts and stakeholders to ensure national plans take into account climate change-related hazards,” Skyllerstedt said. “Many African countries face challenges in fighting impacts of extreme weather such as floods and droughts, and here is where the adaption programme is relevant.”

For the next three years GWP intends to widen its support to encompass not only national climate change adaptation programmes but also Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs) on reductions in greenhouse gas emissions that countries published prior to the 2015 United Nations Climate Change Conference in Paris.

“National Adaptation Programmes (NAPs) and NDCs should be merged to avoid duplications,” she observed.

The biggest challenge to implementation of GWP programmes by its partners in Africa and elsewhere remains access to financial resources.

“During the COP21 in Paris last year, there were lots of pledges on financing initiatives for enhancing water security and its access by the poor. Unfortunately, our partners are not able to access the money due technical bottlenecks,” she said.

The situation has compelled GWP to embark on enhancing the capacity of their partners in Africa in the spheres of  project design as well as making of investment plans and strategies.

Skyllerstedt spoke to IPS during the World Water Week held in Stockholm, Sweden from 28 Aug. 28 to Sep. 2 and organised by the Stockholm International Water Institute.